Cdc fact sheet concussions

Cdc fact sheet concussions

Heads Up is a series of educational initiatives, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which share a common goal: to help protect people of all ages, especially children and teens, from concussions and other serious brain... It is estimated that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur in the U.S. each year during competitive sports and recreational activities. As many as 50 percent of those concussions may go unreported. While football is often cited as the most dangerous and damaging of sports, other sports can pose a risk as well. CDC has compiled an array of concussion information fact sheets. There is also information on the website about CDC’s HEADS UP Concussion and Helmet Safety mobile app. A Fact Sheet for Parents Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Injury Response Subject: A fact sheet for parents about concussions and how to about how to recognize and respond properly to concussions. Keywords

heads up concussion in youth sports u. s. department centers for of health and human services disease control and prevention cdc play live to play, Concussions and other brain related trauma can be serious and potentially life threatening. However, if managed properly, most athletes can enjoy participation in sports after sustaining a concussion. Ashland Public Schools has developed procedures to ensure the safety and well-being of all student athletes. CDC has compiled an array of concussion information fact sheets. There is also information on the website about CDC’s HEADS UP Concussion and Helmet Safety mobile app.

CAL SOUTH CONCUSSION INFORMATION FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS Dear Members, Under the provisions of California Legislature Assembly Bill No. 2007, youth sports organizations are required toprovide a concussion and head injury information sheet to each athlete on a yearly basis. The information sheet shall be signed and returned by the athlete

Broome Tioga BOCES CONCUSSION FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS WHAT IS A CONCUSSION? A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump or blow to the head. A Fact Sheet for Parents Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Injury Response Subject: A fact sheet for parents about concussions and how to about how to recognize and respond properly to concussions. Keywords

A fAct sheet for coAches The FacTs • A concussion is a brain injury. • All concussions are serious. • Concussions can occur without loss of consciousness or other obvious signs. • Concussions can occur from blows to the body as well as to the head. • Concussions can occur in any sport. • Recognition and proper response to ... A FACT SHEET FOR ATHLETES What is a concussion? A concussion is a brain injury that: • Is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body. •Can change the way your brain normally works. •Can occur during practices or games in any sport or recreational activity. •Can happen even if you haven’t been knocked out. A FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS The Iowa Legislature passed a new law, effective July 1, 2011, regarding students in grades 7 – 12 who participate in extracurricular interscholastic activities. Please note this important information from Iowa Code Section 280.13C, Brain Injury Policies: A Fact Sheet for Parents Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Injury Response Subject: A fact sheet for parents about concussions and how to about how to recognize and respond properly to concussions. Keywords Read more about the danger signs and symptoms, what to do if your child has a concussion and more important information in this useful CDC Fact Sheet for Parents. ayso brain injury child protection child safety common soccer injuries concussion care concussions head injury injuries injury pain safety hazards youth soccer

A Fact Sheet for Parents Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Injury Response Subject: A fact sheet for parents about concussions and how to about how to recognize and respond properly to concussions. Keywords Heads Up is a series of educational initiatives, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which share a common goal: to help protect people of all ages, especially children and teens, from concussions and other serious brain... Heads Up is a series of educational initiatives, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which share a common goal: to help protect people of all ages, especially children and teens, from concussions and other serious brain...

Broome Tioga BOCES CONCUSSION FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS WHAT IS A CONCUSSION? A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump or blow to the head. • Number of previous concussions (if any). INFORM THE ATHLETE’S PARENT(S) ABOUT THE POSSIBLE CONCUSSION. Let them know about the possible concussion and give them the HEADS UP fact sheet for parents. This fact sheet can help parents watch the athlete for concussion signs or symptoms that may show up or get worse once the athlete is

It is estimated that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur in the U.S. each year during competitive sports and recreational activities. As many as 50 percent of those concussions may go unreported. While football is often cited as the most dangerous and damaging of sports, other sports can pose a risk as well.

A FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS What is a concussion? A concussion is a brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. They can range from mild to severe and can disrupt the way the brain normally works. Even a “ding” or a bump on the head can be serious. What are the signs and symptoms? You can’t see a concussion. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION A Fact Sheet for COACHES THE FACTS • A concussion is a brain injury. • All concussions are serious. • Concussions can occur without loss of consciousness. • Concussions can occur in any sport. • Recognition and proper management of concussions when they

Patients often ask us why there has been such a big fuss about concussions (mild traumatic brain injuries, or TBI) recently. The reality is that, if left untreated, concussions can lead to a higher risk for a second concussion, which, if this occurs before the first concussion is resolved, can lead to permanent brain d

Number of previous concussions (if any) 3. INFORM THE ATHLETE’S PARENTS OR GUARDIANS. Let them know about the possible concussion and give them the Heads Up fact sheet for parents. This fact sheet can help parents monitor the athlete for signs or symptoms that appear or get worse once the athlete is at home or returns to school. 4. Concussions and other brain related trauma can be serious and potentially life threatening. However, if managed properly, most athletes can enjoy participation in sports after sustaining a concussion. Ashland Public Schools has developed procedures to ensure the safety and well-being of all student athletes. A Fact Sheet for Coaches. Concussions. ... CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. ... Pass out the concussion fact sheets for athletes and Heads Up is a series of educational initiatives, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which share a common goal: to help protect people of all ages, especially children and teens, from concussions and other serious brain... This fact sheet is for parents of children and teens who have recently had a concussion. It will tell you what to expect over the next days and weeks and offer some suggestions for helping your child through the recovery period.

A Fact Sheet for Coaches. Concussions. ... CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. ... Pass out the concussion fact sheets for athletes and CDC: Concussion Fact Sheet for School Professionals CDC: Fact Sheet for School Nurses . Concussion in Sports . Concussions 101, a Primer for Kids and Parents CDC: Concussion Awareness CDC: Head’s Up for Healthcare Providers and Parents Concussions 101, a Primer for Kids and Parents . Facts_about_Concussion_TBI-a